Glass: Daum Nancy

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The Daum Company was founded by Jean Daum (1825 – 1889). He was a financier of the company when it had another name, “Verrerie Sainte Catherine”; Jean Daum took control before it failed.

His sons, Auguste and Antonin, soon joined him in the business, and they worked with major artists such as Gruber, Bergé, Schneider and Watler who introduced the pâte-de-verre technique.
Another complex technique developed by Daum is called intercalary decoration which was patented by Daum in 1898.
In 1909 Paul Daum became the new director of Daum Frères, and in the 1920s, Daum produced the majority of its art deco items.

During the 1920s, Michel Daum, son of Antonin Daum, started to work as an engineer , but after Paul’s death he took over his function as chief designer.
In 1965 Michel retired and Jacques Daum became president of the company.

 

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Lewis Hine

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Lewis W. Hine (1874-1940) was an American Photographer and Sociologist, best known for his photography about child labor in the United States. He studied sociology in Chicago and New York becoming a teacher and then in 1908 left his teaching position for a full-time job as an investigative photographer for the National Child Labor Committee.

Lewis Hine travelled the country taking pictures of children working in factories; in one year he covered over 12,000 miles.

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Jacob Riis

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Jacob Riis (1849 – 1914) was a Danish American journalist and social documentary photographer. He is also known for his crusade against poverty in early 20th century New York City slums. While he was looking for a job, he had to spend the night in in police station lodging houses. Aware of what it was like to live in poverty, Riis was determined to use this opportunity to employ his journalistic skills to communicate this to the public. 

 

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Emile Gallé

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Emile Gallé (1846 – 1904) was a French Art Nouveau glassmaker, cabinetmaker and ceramicist. After training in art, botany and chemistry, he began to produce ceramics, furniture and jewellery.

At the Paris International Exhibition (1889), he presented his glass work, in particular new types of glass, such as engraved cameo glass and new forms of vases in new colours.

 

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Casina delle Civette (House of the Owls) , Rome

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The Casina delle Civette was created on several transformations to the “Swiss Cabin”, and it was the residence of Prince Giovanni Torlania the younger until his death in 1938; the building is part of Villa Torlonia.
It was originally designed in 1840 then in 1916 the building started to be known as the “House of the Owls”, maybe because the motif of the owl is used almost obsessively in the decorations as choice of Prince Giovanni who loved esoteric symbols.
The building is decorated in Liberty style and inside there are several stained glasses by Umberto Bottazzi, Duilio Cambellotti, Paolo Paschetto, Giulio Cesare Giuliani and Cesare Picchiarini.
I went there 5 months ago and if you go to Rome going there is a MUST!

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