Eugène Atget

Tags

, , , ,

Jean-Eugène-Auguste Atget (1857 – 1927) was a French photographer best known for his photos of “Vieux Paris”.

He studied at the Conservatoire d’Art Dramatique in Paris for a year but was dismissed to finish his military service. Atget produced nearly 12,000 pieces of work (approximately 2000 8×10 glass plates and 10,000 prints). The Government purchased over 2,600 of Atget’s plates to deposit in the national historic registry. He started his career as a photographer around 1890; Atget utilized the technique of “vignetting,” which exposes the center of the photograph to be bright and clear while the edges fade away in saturation and clarity.

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

ImageImage

 

 

 

 

John Gutmann

Tags

, , ,

John Gutmann (1905 – 1998) was was a german photographer. He trained as a painter then in 1933 he bought a camera and  moved to United States. He started to work for magazines as a photographer. Gutmann was really interested in jazz artists and worked with lots of musicians. He created the John Gutmann Photography Fellowship Award.Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

 

Image

 

Image

 

 

 

 

Edward Steichen

Tags

, , ,

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

 

Image

 

Image

 

Edward Jean Steichen (1879 – 1973) was an American photographer, painter and museum curator.

He started his career officially as a painter then, when he went to New York to show his works to Stieglitz -who really appreciated his talent- he came back to France and he abandoned his painting studies at the Académie Julian.  He started to focus his work on photography; once back in New York he rented a studio at 291 Fifth Avenue, that became the meeting place of “Photo-Secession”, the loose-knit group of photographers he exhibited, published, and promoted.

He was a photographer for the Condé Nast magazines Vogue and Vanity Fair from 1923 to 1938 and he directed the war documentary The Fighting Lady, which won the 1945 Academy Award for Best Documentary.

Jewellery by René Lalique

Tags

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

Image

Image

 

Image

Image

 

Image

 

Image

 

René Jules Lalique (1860 – 1945) was a French artist. He was famous for his jewellery, vases, clocks and chandeliers. 

He studied and worked at the Ecole des Arts Décoratifs, then he spent two years at the Crystal Palace School of Art Sydenham.

He experimented new techniques and used new prestigious materials, such as glass and enamel, ivory and amber, pearls and semi-precious stones. Lalique created designs for Aucoc, Boucheron, Cartier, Destape, Gariod, Hamelin, Jacta and many others. He created a wide range of beautiful glasswork, such as vases, desk or toilet accessories and tableware designed for industrial production.